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February 2022

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Japan-U.S. Summit Video Teleconference Meeting

  • Japan-U.S. Summit Video Teleconference Meeting
Japan-U.S. Summit Video Teleconference Meeting

On January 21, 2022, Mr. Kishida Fumio, Prime Minister of Japan, held a Japan-U.S. summit video teleconference meeting with the Honorable Joseph R. Biden, Jr., President of the United States of America. The overview of the meeting is as follows.

The two leaders shared the intention to coordinate closely under the strong Japan-U.S. Alliance and to deepen cooperation with like-minded countries such as Australia, India, ASEAN, and Europe, toward realizing a “Free and Open Indo-Pacific.” In this regard, Prime Minister Kishida expressed his intention to host the Japan-Australia-India-U.S. (QUAD) Summit Meeting in Japan in the first half of this year by inviting President Biden to Japan, to which President Biden expressed his support.

The two leaders exchanged their views on the recent regional issues.

•  The two leaders opposed unilateral attempts to change the status quo in the East and South China Seas and any economic coercion, and shared the intention to coordinate closely in addressing various issues related to China. In addition, the two leaders underscored the importance of peace and stability across the Taiwan Strait and encouraged the peaceful resolution of cross-Strait issues. Furthermore, they shared serious concerns about the situation in Hong Kong and the human rights situation in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region.

•  Based on the common understanding that North Korea’s nuclear and missile activities, including the ballistic missile launches in January this year (2022), pose a threat to the peace and stability of Japan, the region and the international community, the two leaders shared the intention to continue close coordination between Japan and the United States as well as among Japan, the United States and the Republic of Korea toward the complete denuclearization of North Korea in accordance with the UN Security Council resolutions. In addition, Prime Minister Kishida asked for continued understanding and cooperation toward the immediate resolution of the abductions issue, to which President Biden offered his renewed support. Prime Minister Kishida and President Biden affirmed the importance of close cooperation among Japan, the United States, and the ROK in addressing common challenges, and underscored the imperative of a strong trilateral relationship between Japan, the United States, and the ROK.

•  Regarding the situation around Ukraine, the two leaders shared the intention to continue coordination between Japan and the United States. The leaders committed to work closely together to deter Russian aggression against Ukraine. Prime Minister Kishida pledged to continue close coordination with the United States, other allies and partners, and the international community on taking strong action in response to any attack.

Endorsing the Joint Statement of the Japan-U.S. Security Consultative Committee (“2+2”) held on January 7 this year, in light of the increasingly severe security environment in the region, the two leaders shared the intention to further strengthen the deterrence and response capabilities of the Japan-U.S. Alliance. Prime Minister Kishida expressed his determination to fundamentally reinforce Japan’s defense capabilities by newly formulating the National Security Strategy, the National Defense Program Guidelines, and the Mid-Term Defense Program, and President Biden expressed his support to it and underscored the importance of sustaining vital investments in defense over time. In addition, President Biden reaffirmed the U.S.’s unwavering commitment to the defense of Japan and extended deterrence, including the application of Article V of the Japan-U.S. Security Treaty to the Senkaku Islands. Furthermore, the two leaders confirmed their intention to advance cooperation on space and cyber, information security and advanced technology. The two leaders agreed to continue working closely together to prevent the spread of COVID-19, including by aligning efforts in and around U.S. facilities and areas in Japan.

Prime Minister Kishida explained the idea of “New Form of Capitalism,” and the two leaders shared the view to deepen discussions on new policy initiatives toward realizing sustainable and inclusive economy and society at the next summit meeting. In addition, the two leaders confirmed their close coordination on economic security. Furthermore, the two leaders concurred on the launch of the ministerial Japan-U.S. Economic Policy Consultative Committee (the Economic “2+2”), and shared the intention to expand and deepen bilateral economic cooperation and mutual exchanges based on the “Japan-U.S. Competitiveness and Resilience (CoRe) Partnership.” The two leaders also confirmed that they will expand the bilateral economic cooperation to the Indo-Pacific region, and Prime Minister Kishida welcomed the U.S.’s commitment to the region including an Indo-Pacific Economic Framework (IPEF).

Prime Minister Kishida illustrated his idea of nuclear disarmament grounded in realism, to which President Biden expressed his support, and the two leaders confirmed their intention to work together toward a world without nuclear weapons. In addition, the two leaders underscored the significance of the Japan-U.S. Joint Statement on the NPT released on January 21. Besides, the two leaders confirmed the strong determination to lead the international community in addressing global issues such as COVID-19 and climate change.

Based on the common understanding of the importance of multilayered people-to-people exchange, the two leaders confirmed their intention to continue promotion of such exchanges, including the Mansfield Fellowship Program, the KAKEHASHI Project and the Quad Fellowship, and build bridges that support the future of the two countries.

The two leaders shared the intention to continue their close communication, including in-person meetings.

Note: This article has been created with the consent of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan and on the basis of materials published by the Ministry